5 broken cameras

5 broken cameras

DVD - 2012 | Arabic
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"5 Broken Cameras is a deeply personal, first hand-account of non-violent resistance in Bil'in, a West Bank village threatened by encroaching Israeli settlements. Shot almost entirely by Palestinian farmer Emad Burnat, who bought his first camera in 2005 to record the birth of his youngest son, the footage was later given to Israeli co-director Guy Davidi to edit. Structured around the violent destruction of each one of Burnat's cameras, the filmmakers' collaboration follows one family's evolution over five years of village turmoil. Burnat watches from behind the lens as olive trees are bulldozed, protests intensify and lives are lost."--Case.
Publisher: New York : Kino Lorber Edu, 2012.
Edition: Full screen and widescreen.
Branch Call Number: DVD 956.94054 F
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (90 min.) :,sd., col. with b&w sequences,,12 cm.

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t
Tinker5T
Dec 04, 2017

5 cameras, 5 stories but more or less the same and more tragic each time.

u
uncommonreader
Sep 23, 2017

Documentary proof of the theft of Palestinian land by Israel and the illegal spread of Israeli settlements.

m
Merileeann
Sep 20, 2017

A picture's worth a thousand words.

e
enness
Jun 17, 2016

The film is almost entirely in Arabic. Bonus material is in Hebrew and English.
My summary of the film is really a long review.
Who has noticed the absence of Palestinian civil police for crowd control? Palestinian civil police deployments are part of the Oslo Accords as a move toward independence. (By the way, the village of about 1,600 people doesn't have a police station, according to a Palestinian study as of 2012.) What Westerner would organize a protest -- actually any public event -- without crowd control by police?
The determination by Israel's High Court of Justice in favor of the villagers was a hollow victory. The Israeli military built a wall adjacent to the Israeli new town. They tore down a barbed wire fence with a generally unmanned gate and built a wall with a guarded passage through this new barrier. The court did not object to a barrier or to any security fences as such. The issue here, and in one or two other segments of the barrier, was whether the barrier was more intrusive than necessary as a security measure to prevent terrorist attacks.

l
LittleNoName
Jan 30, 2016

Very interesting. Learned a lot about conflict in the Middle East. Seems so overwhelming yet somehow they continue to protest for what is legally theirs year after yea & despite multiple tragic deaths. Although its just a tiny village they make a difference.

ydigernes (2nd to last commenter)...I agree.

kontikk (last commenter)...it is one sided but no where does it say this is the whole truth. Its simply from one mans perspective. In this sense its very well done & deserves a high rating.

2
2314Ben
Oct 16, 2014

Total translation film.
Interesting to see the interaction between West Bank and Israeli settlers.
Leads me to more or less believe this action is going on all over the Middle East (land grabs with military force).
Sad state of affairs.

j
Jayroc
Jul 20, 2014

Outstanding and heart breaking. A must watch for these times as Israel commits genocide in Gaza. :(

o
Old_Toto
Jan 20, 2014

Rarely does one witness years of sustained courage and resourcefulness as demonstrated by this videographer. His fellow citizens remind me of Gandhi and M.L. King, Jr. and their constituents attempting to practice non-violent resistance under life-threatening stress.

y
yellow_rabbit_33A
Oct 23, 2013

It took me a while to get into this film but by the end, you really feel for the characters. It was pretty powerful I thought.

a
afraalmussawir
Aug 16, 2013

Excellent narration! The English subtitles are fluent and accurate translations. The 5 broken cameras (and the circumstances of their breaking) frame the events of the documentary, and it's an effective conceit, but not the real focus of the movie. This documentary focuses on a microcosm of the conflict between Jewish settlers in the West Bank and the Palestinians who are trying to prevent the annexation of their lands. The filmmaker shows events from his point of view over a period of years, starting with the birth of his youngest son. As viewers of the documentary, we see all the events that follow through this lens: his role as a father. There is an acute scene where the filmmaker's wife is going over maps of the area with their children and teaching the youngest, "This is our land, our village. This is the land they are stealing from us." (That's not a direct quote, just the gist of what she was saying). That's just one of many parts of the movie that put a human face on the conflict, and though this movie is about one specific Palestinian village and the people who belong there, it feels like it reflects the situation of many villages and many people. ** SPOILER ALERT** The ending is touching and graphic.

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e
enness
Jun 17, 2016

The film is almost entirely in Arabic. Bonus material is in Hebrew and English.
We see here one man's wounds and joys, and his mental picture of his little corner in the world. We are missing the large scale such as the Oslo Accords of 1995, though. For unfathomable reasons, about half this village's olive grove was designated as being in Area C -- full Israeli military occupation (on an "interim basis"). The Israeli military built a security fence within Area C.
Neither cameraman Burnat nor Israeli co-director Davidi seems to be aware of how the Oslo Accords are part of the overarching structure of life in the Palestinian territories. Furthermore, virtually no viewer is aware of how land issues in former provinces of the Ottoman Empire (dead by defeat in WWI) are governed by the Ottoman Land Law of 1858 (eighteen fifty-eight!). The Crown owns all land (as it once had in Britain, for instance). The British inherited the role of Crown during the Mandate period, and the State of Israel and the incipient Palestine have inherited this law. When the Kingdom of Jordan occupied and annexed the West Bank until 1967, they did not enact any land reform just as they hadn't in Jordan itself. The Ottoman law is the core structure of Israeli land law and the land law of the occupied territories. The Crown owns the land, and tax payments permit use of the land.
We Euro-Americans are not aware and little likely to understand how different this part of the world is from ours.
The determination by Israel's High Court of Justice in favor of the village was a hollow victory. The Israeli military built a wall adjacent to the Israeli new town. They tore down a barbed wire fence with a generally unmanned gate and built a wall with a guarded passage through this new barrier.
Beyond this, concerning peaceful demonstrations, who notices the absence of Palestinian civil police for crowd control? Palestinian police presence is also part of the Oslo Accords as a move toward independence. (By the way, the village of about 1,600 people doesn't have a police station, according to a Palestinian study as of 2012.) What Westerner would organize a protest -- actually any public event -- without crowd control by police?
Is hurling chunks of building concrete, rocks, and stones at a handful of young Israeli soldiers who are fulfilling their three years of mandatory military service called a nonviolent demonstration? What if they were police officers or National Guard members? What outcomes can be anticipated there or in the West?
Gandhi's and Dr. King's nonviolence generally consisted of symbolic protests, civil disobedience, economic or political noncooperation. Gullible Jimmy Carter, when visiting, doesn't see (or is protected from seeing) the typical weekly events.Western promoters of this film demonstrate a colonialist if not racist view of Palestinians. "We don't expect them to live in a twenty-first century civil society."
By the end if the film, cameraman and co-director Burnat describes power in the hands of villagers because they demonstrated.
Actually, the villagers emerge as powerless as before.

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aaa5756 Jun 15, 2013

“One person can make a difference and every person should try.” –John F Kennedy

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